Learnings and preliminary case study on youth smoking behaviours

We have recently been involved in designing a social marketing campaign to help prevent the uptake of smoking by young Aboriginal people in Adelaide. It has been an excellent opportunity to work with our partners Winangali for local Aboriginal organisation – Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia – who are doing great work bringing positive change for healthy lifestyles to their community.

Don't let your dreams go up in smokes

During the research phase, we came across a number of interesting studies that helped us to understand the influences and uncover insights that informed the design of the campaign strategy. The literature also highlighted some of the challenges and opportunities facing behaviour change campaigns for young people.

What is Social Marketing?

The concept of social marketing is often confused with ‘social media marketing’, i.e. using social media as a tool to get messages out to an audience on social media.

When we use the term social marketing, it relates to using marketing strategies and concepts, backed up by research, to influence behaviours that benefit individuals and communities for social good (not to say that social media can’t be used as part of this).

The idea is that the savvy (and scientific) techniques used by marketers to get you to buy their product can instead be used to support and enable people to make better choices for themselves – contributing to broader social, health and environmental outcomes.

Behavioural segmentation

Public awareness campaigns are an essential tool to communicate important messages to a broad audience that can change attitudes and behaviours.

In the case of smoking there has been enormous success in Australia and worldwide in reducing smoking rates using large-scale anti-smoking awareness campaigns, along with policy initiatives like restricting cigarette brand advertising and the act of smoking in public and common places. All of these strategies have succeeded by denormalising smoking in society in general.

These government-led anti-smoking initiatives and campaigns in Australia have been very successful at changing behaviours of the general population, with daily smoking rates declining at a steady rate from around 35% in 1980 to 15.1% in 2010.

However, they have been much less effective in reducing the rate of smoking among Australia’s Indigenous population. Smoking rates have declined in recent years (from 2002 to 2012 dropping from 49% to 41%), but the rate still remains at approximately two and a half times that of non-Indigenous people. Statistics also show that Indigenous kids take up smoking at an earlier age than non-Indigenous, and that over 60% of Indigenous households contain at least one smoker.  Continue reading

The science is in – doing good is good for you

image
The science is most definitely in – doing good is very good for your mind and body. In fact, being kind and helpful to others has been found to be more effective than the latest wonder drug, vitamin or super food… not least because it’s completely free and accessible to everyone. And the implications are much bigger than the individual, as the positive effects of altruism are spread through social connections, creating an ever-widening positive feedback loop in society.

Volunteering for social good has traditionally been something that we do as individuals, and while some of us manage to scrape together the time to ‘give back’ regularly, for many people I know the common refrain is “something I’d really like to do when I get some more time”. But, what if the positive effects of doing good (and related positive thinking and emotional intelligence skills) could be harnessed in the workplace as well as in our personal lives? In my opinion, this is a triple whammy as there are benefits for individual wellbeing and personal development; organisations get to create meaningful impact through employee engagement to complement existing CSR programs; and communities benefit directly through the skills and support donated to the not-for-profit sector.

What the Science Tells Us

Why is altruism good for us? Continue reading

The Nonprofit Rooster!!

I was recently trying to write an explanation about why nonprofits should invest in social engagement. The most obvious point that came to mind was fundraising. When individuals or partners are more engaged they’re more likely to donate regularly and invest more in your cause.
But when I started to visualize the relationship between raising funds and engagement and how these interact or which comes first, I found myself thinking about chickens and eggs!

Either way it’s clear that engagement and dollars connect people with projects and the cause.

Continue reading